///// ABOUT

PURPOSE-FOCUSED
TRAINING

///// JOHN F. KENNEDY ONCE SAID

“Efforts and courage are not enough without purpose and direction.”

Generally, purpose is the reason for which something is done or created or for which something exists. In the military, purpose is often engrained in your mission, and many vets struggle to gain that same sense of meaning upon leaving the military. This lack of purpose can be detrimental for many, and can be a factor in depression, PTSD, and even suicide.

The RECON Network is focused on helping each veteran identify their own purpose, and plan their future careers and affiliations around that newly-established sense of purpose.

In a workforce discussion, purpose is defined as the intersection between

  • What you love to do
  • What the world around you needs
  • What you are good at
  • What you can get paid to do

PURPOSE + WORKFORCE

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

89% of employees with high levels of well-being reported high job satisfaction. Nearly two thirds of those employees reported consistently putting in extra effort at work (Bright Horizons). Meanwhile, business units in the top quartile on employee engagement averaged $80,000 to $120,000 higher sales revenue per month (Gallup).

CULTURE

87% of organizations cite culture and engagement as one of their top challenges, and 50% call the problem “very important” (Deloitte University Press).

RETENTION

In the U.S., only 29% of workers feel engaged at work (Gallup). Meanwhile, most engaged employees are 87% less likely to leave their organization (Corporate Leadership Council).

PURPOSE + HEALTH

RESEARCH

People who are happy but lack meaning in their lives show the same gene expression patterns as those who are struggling with prolonged adversity—their bodies are preparing to fight off bacterial infections. The problem with this is that if it continues in a prolonged state, it can increase the risks of major illnesses like cancer and heart disease, because the body is in a constant state of inflammation (National Academy of Sciences – Barbara Fredrickson, Steve Cole).

PURPOSE + GENERATIONS

Today, two generations make up over 2/3 of the workforce. Here’s how they view career + purpose.

Generation X: 1966–1980 (ages 50-36)

  • Responsible for creating the work/life balance concept
  • Possesses strong technical skills
  • Is more independent than prior generationst

Millennials: 1981–2000 (ages 35-16)

  • Most resilient in navigating change
  • Most educated generation of workers today
  • Willingness to work hard and set goals to achieve the lifestyle they want
  • 79% say it’s more important to enjoy their job than to make money

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